Roberto Aldera

Home/Roberto Aldera

Email: roberto_[at]_robots.ox.ac.uk

Bio

Roberto joined the Oxford Robotics Institute in 2017 as a DPhil student at Pembroke College. He completed his BSc (Eng) in Mechatronics at the University of Cape Town where his thesis focused on control and jump stabilisation of a bio-inspired mobile robot, drawing inspiration from jumping spiders and their use of silk draglines in aerial righting.

His research interests at the Oxford Robotics Institute are centred on navigation in mobile robotics using radar. When not in the lab, Roberto enjoys trail running and playing the guitar.

Publications

2019

  • [PDF] R. Aldera, D. De Martini, M. Gadd, and P. Newman, “Fast Radar Motion Estimation with a Learnt Focus of Attention using Weak Supervision,” in Proceedings of the IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation (ICRA), Montreal, Canada, 2019.
    [Bibtex]
    @InProceedings{2019ICRA_aldera,
    author = {Aldera, Roberto and De Martini, Daniele and Gadd, Matthew and Newman, Paul},
    title = {Fast Radar Motion Estimation with a Learnt Focus of Attention using Weak Supervision},
    booktitle = {Proceedings of the IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation (ICRA), Montreal, Canada},
    year = {2019},
    pdf = {http://www.robots.ox.ac.uk/~mobile/Papers/2019ICRA_aldera.pdf},
    }
  • [PDF] R. Aldera, D. De Martini, M. Gadd, and P. Newman, “What Could Go Wrong? Introspective Radar Odometry in Challenging Environments,” in IEEE Intelligent Transportation Systems (ITSC) Conference, Auckland, New Zealand, 2019.
    [Bibtex]
    @InProceedings{2019ITSC_aldera,
    author = {Aldera, Roberto and De Martini, Daniele and Gadd, Matthew and Newman, Paul},
    title = {{What Could Go Wrong? Introspective Radar Odometry in Challenging Environments}},
    booktitle = {{IEEE Intelligent Transportation Systems (ITSC) Conference}},
    year = {2019},
    address = {Auckland, New Zealand},
    month = {October},
    pdf = {http://www.robots.ox.ac.uk/~mobile/Papers/2019ITSC_aldera.pdf},
    }

Blog posts

Introspective Radar Odometry

How do we know when we don’t know? This is an important question to answer in any situation where we need to navigate through our surroundings, and something any autonomous mobile robot needs to know too. We discuss this introspection capability and its importance to our radar-based navigation algorithms in our paper which is to be presented at ITSC 2019 - “What Could Go Wrong? Introspective Radar Odometry in Challenging Environments” by Roberto Aldera, Daniele De Martini, Matthew Gadd, and Paul Newman. [bibtex key="2019ITSC_aldera"] With introspection, our Radar Odometry (RO) system is now [...]

By |July 24th, 2019|Categories: MRG Highlights, MRG News, ORI Blog|Tags: , , , , , |

Fast Radar Motion Estimation

Fast Radar Motion Estimation This blog post provides an overview of our paper “Fast Radar Motion Estimation with a Learnt Focus of Attention using Weak Supervision” by Roberto Aldera, Daniele De Martini, Matthew Gadd, and Paul Newman which was recently accepted for publication at the IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation (ICRA) 2019. [bibtex key="2019ICRA_aldera"] For a quick overview you can take a look at our video: Why radar? Radar is ideal for ego-motion estimation and localisation tasks as it is good at detecting stable environmental features under adverse weather and [...]

By |April 10th, 2019|Categories: MRG Highlights, ORI Blog|Tags: , |

What about radar?

Radar is awesome. When most people think of radar, they imagine a line sweeping around an old CRT display with its characteristic green hue - interrupted by approaching aircraft, or perhaps distant ships over the horizon. While our experience with cameras and GPS has remained up-to-date as hardware has advanced, our perceptions of radar are largely based on a sensor of the past. And even among roboticists who should know a little more about available sensors, this technology is underutilised. However, radar has advanced far beyond the point of crude object detection and is [...]

By |November 21st, 2018|Categories: ORI Blog|Tags: , , |
2019-07-23T18:33:54+00:00